Saturday, May 14, 2022

Another use for your mailbox: donate food today!

I just spotted this story on the KVOA News 4 Tucson website:

    Help fight hunger by leaving food donations at mailbox Saturday

It's going to be hot today, and I've read stories of peoples' cans of food bursting when they get really hot. So if your letter carrier comes later in the day, you might want to wait until closer to that time to leave your donations. Or stop by a post office.

(In other mailbox news: I'm slowly gathering more photos. I hope to post a batch fairly soon!)

Monday, February 28, 2022

Mailboxes (mostly) on vacation?

I love to travel, but the pandemic has mostly kept me at home for two years. This year I'm aiming to make up for it. :) Although I'll hope to find a bunch of mailboxes during my time in Tucson, I may not post many mailboxes for several months. I hope you'll keep checking back here or following @TucsonArt on Twitter, where each post here will be automatically tweeted.

Right now I'm in Northern California, where I saw this mailbox with a smiling moon and stars along a narrow country road:

Monday, February 21, 2022

1115 West Congress Street: Cactus-topped tiles

Here's a unique mailbox post: five “branches,” each with a tile on front and a cactus top on top:
David Aber sent it on February 15th. Thanks, Dave!

Monday, February 14, 2022

3174 East 26th Street: Potpourri

Next time you're at Reid Park, you might want to come four blocks south on Country Club and turn left on 26th to see this wild collection:

Part of what makes this fun is the multicolored yard. I didn't think to take a photo when I was there on February 7th.

Monday, January 31, 2022

A mailbox full of inspiration

After last week's “A mailbox full of poems,” here's another mailbox with messages of inspiration / mensajes de inspiración in Tucson's Barrio Libre neighborhood. Open it to find a stack of messages, as well as a pad and pencil to write your own. This video was posted January 24 on Instagram by @wagon_burner_arts. (If you don't have an account, you can probably click there to see some of their work as long as you don't click on any.)

Monday, January 24, 2022

A mailbox full of poems

Treat Avenue runs north-south through central Tucson, but it becomes a sidewalk as it crosses the Broadmoor-Broadway Village neighborhood. It's a nice place to walk; there are benches along its length. Half a block north of Arroyo Chico is a poetry mailbox: Pick up a poem, leave a poem, or write a poem while you sit on the bench:
It's organized by Urban Poetry Pollinators, @urbanpoetrypollinators on Instagram. (If you don't have an account, I think you can click/tap on that link and scroll a bit.)


As far as I know, the mailbox doesn't have a street address. Below is a Google Map showing it:


Here's a link to that map: https://goo.gl/maps/3C3PfejUUdcwiX6H9. You can also ask your GPS for 32.217229417796304, -110.93086206093965. I was there on January 13th.

Monday, January 17, 2022

3044 North Flanwill Boulevard: This mailbox does not overheat

On January 4th — which, the National Weather Service reports, had a high temperature of 70 degrees — David Aber spotted this mailbox topped by a spinning Roof Turbine Vent:
The base has 46 tiles and the door is made of Aluminum Diamond Tread Plate. The mailbox faces west. The first photo is a view of the north and west side. The second is the south and east side. The Roof Turbine Vent on top is in turn topped by a decorative piece:
As usual, I'm amazed by another unbelievable mailbox that he found somehow. (Dave tells me that he spends a lot of time relaxing at home. I'm not so sure. :)

Monday, January 10, 2022

5742 East Helen Street: A critter in paradise

December 8th, 2021, while I was waiting for my lunch at the nearby Salad & Go location, I decided to cruise the neighborhood nearby to see if I could find any interesting mailboxes. I did:

Monday, January 3, 2022

232 East Limberlost Drive: Ten years of mailboxes

Happy 2022! On December 12, 2012, I posted the first mailbox in this blog in What's a mailbox?. Let's get started on another year of boxes.

One of the things I like about artistic mailboxes is that you never know what combinations they'll have. In this case, the house numbers have a desert landscape inside and there's a woodpecker trying to get bugs out of the steel post:

I found this box on December 11, 2021 (ten years after the first mailbox). I'd just left the Stone Curves mural repainting around the corner.